Edits On Pork – Part 2

QUESTION:

I would like to know more about this disease-carrying germ.

ANSWER:

Dr. Widmer writes in the article, Pork, Man and Disease - mentioned earlier:

"The trichina worm is essentially limited to Central Europe and those parts of temperate America to which its emigrants have gone.

"In comparison with the ciliate and the pork tapeworm the trichina worm produces the most serious effects in the human body. The adults are present in the small intestine of man. After mating, the females produce larvae which enter the blood vessels for distribution to all parts of the body. These migrating larvae may invade skeletal muscles, brain, bone marrow, retina, and the lungs. Since each female worm can produce more than 1,500 larvae, and since these immature worms invade many organs of the body, many clinical symptoms may appear. In heavy infections death may take place in the second or third week, but more often it occurs in the fourth to the sixth week after exposure. Any recovery predictions vary with the location and number of larvae trichinae, severity of symptoms, and the physical condition of the patient."

And now comes an interesting observation.

QUESTION:

What is that, please?

ANSWER:

"Trichinosis," the disease caused by "trichina worms" breaks out like epidemics. And its relation with pigs, like that of plague with rats, was known to people thousands of years ago. Those who do not believe in divine origin of Mosaic and Islamic Laws, say that it was because of this epidemic that these religions prohibited pork.

The same article {Pork, Man and Disease) says:

"It is generally assumed that the presence of trichina worms in pigs was the basis for the prohibition of their use for food by the Jewish people." In his book, A History of Parasitology, W. D. Foster (1965) emphasises this viewpoint when he writes: "The Mosaic and Islamic prohibitions on the eating of pork are far more likely to have been to the observation of out breaks of trichinosis than any other recognition of an association with tapeworm infestation . . .The association of the disease with the eating of pork would be well within the capacity of primitive peoples. Indeed, what is surprising is that this association was lost sight of by the world at large, although the conditions cannot have been uncommon, and looking back we can recognise epidemics which were almost certainly trichinosis." QUESTION:

What is the use of talking about epidemics of long ago? Surely, with advance in medical science, such diseases must have been eradicated from the face of earth?

ANSWER:

Unfortunately, this is not the case. The same article says:

"Outbreaks of trichinosis are still common in the United States. Between March 9 and March 25, 1968, four of seven family members in Willoughby, Ohio, developed symptoms of trichinosis. The family had purchased sausage from a local packing company and after soaking it in oil for several days ate it raw (Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol.17, no.23).

"In May, 1968, a family of eight in New Berlin, Wisconsin, became ill with a "flu-like" disease. Later evidence was obtained that permitted a diagnosis of trichinosis to be made. All of the individuals ate raw 'beef' hamburger sandwiches. It is assumed..."

QUESTION:

If it was cause by beef, why should "pork" be singled out for blame?

ANSWER:

Don't be hasty, my friend. Let me finish the report. It goes on to say:

"It is assumed that these 'beef' hamburgers were contaminated with infected pork since cattle do not harbour the trichina worm (CDC Veterinary Public Health Notes, February, 1969). The hamburger meat was bought at a local market that had a single grinder for pork and beef."

And here is the 3rd report:

"In December, 1969, trichinosis was diagnosed in seventy-six persons in Washington, Missouri. This outbreak was attributed to eating locally manufactured pork which was not processed adequately to destroy the infective larva" (Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, vol.18, no.9).

QUESTION:

Well this last report presents the problem in its true perspective. The infection was caused because the pork was not processed adequately. But with modern scientific methods all bacteria can be destroyed.

ANSWER:

It is a delusion and nothing more. Dr. Shephered writes:

"Ordinary methods of salting and smoking do not kill these worms. Nor can Government inspection of meat at packing houses or abattoirs identify all infected pork."

Dr. Widmer says:

"It is significant to note that from the time of God's Command to the children of Israel until this decade, medical science has had no cure for patients with trichinosis. Treatment consists of alleviation of the symptoms caused by the worms rather tnan destruction of the worms."

After reading these statements of Dr. Shephered and Dr. Widmer we can presume that there is no guarantee of immunity when eating pork which is affected by Trichinella worm. To take pork then is an extremely risky gamble with one's health or life as the stake .

QUESTION:

You said in the beginning that "pork reigns supreme in the greater contents of germs among all meats known to human beings." I would like to have a detailed list of those germs.

ANSWER:

In addition to the bacteria and worms described earlier, pork is the main carrier of the following germs and parasites:

1) Tapeworms 2) Roundworms 3) Hookworms 4) Faciolopsis Buski 5) Paragonimus 6) Clonorchis Sinesis 7) Erysipelothrix Rhusiophathiae

QUESTION:

Will you, please, explain their relation with pork?

ANSWER:

Let us begin with tapeworm.

Tapeworm is called ''Taenia Solium" in Latin. Pork is one of the main sources of this infection .

The incidence of human infection with the pork tapeworm varies throughout the world. In his now classic report "This Wormy World," (1947) Stoll estimated that 2.5 million persons throughout the world were infected with this organism.

QUESTION:

What about roundworm?

ANSWER:

It is a parasite, six to twelve inches long, which is also called a 'travelling worm' because it goes into various organs of the human body. Dr. Ramson mentioned in the 'Stills parisitology,' that these parasites of men are identical with those found in pigs; they belong to the same species. It means that the worm which is found in pork is quite easily transferred to human-beings where it does a lot of damage. The same statement is found in Encyclopaedia Britannica, under 'Roundworm.'

QUESTION:

And what are 'hookworms' ?

ANSWER:

The young worms of this disease enter the human skin by piercing the skin or through any wounds. Pigs eat up human excreta containing eggs of the parasites which develop inside them and they hatch into young worms.

When these are passed out they are infectious to man. This infection is very prevalent in various tropical countries.

Encyclopaedia Britannica (vol . I I ) writes under 'Hookworm':

"Hookworm is a parasitic roundworm. Two parasites Ancylostoma duodenale and Necator americanus cause hookworm disease.

"Hookworm disease is a scourge of tropical climates, resu Iting in a debi I itated anaemic population. Anaemia in hookworm disease results from sucking of blood by the adult worms in the intestine and the attendant inflammation of the bowel. A single A. duodenale can remove, on the average, almost one cubic centimetre of blood a day. As a blood sucker, N. americanus is about one-fifth as efficient.

"In general, the symptoms of classical heavy infections include pallor of skin and mucous membranes, fluid retention in the face and extremities, constipation alternating with diarrhea, abdominal tenderness, increased appetite for bulky foods or unusual substances (clay eaters), sexual derangements (delayed puberty, impotence irregular menstruation), endocrine insufficiency, stunted growth, cardiac weakness, palpitation, hyper-sensitiveness of the skin to cold, physical debility, fatigue, dullness, apathy and melancholia."

QUESTION:

Now what about Faciolopsis Buski?

ANSWER:

These parasites were discovered by Lankaster (1857) and Odliver (1902). These parasites remain latent for a good time in the pig's small intestines. The parasite on leaving the pig infects the watersnail which in turn infects man. It is extremely prevalent in China.